2009-11-23

Recycle question

So, I have pretty much replaced all my light bulbs with CFCs over the past year. One of those bulbs went out. So I took it back to Lowes to recycle it. The young lady at the customer service desk told me that they don't recycle those bulbs. I thought there was a state law that mandates that business that sell CFCs must recycle them. Is that not the case? If not, what do I do with the bulb? It contains mercury so putting it in the trash is not an option. Anyone got any ideas on this?

5 comments:

Adrian said...

My dad suggested breaking the bulb open to release the mercury vapor because it will no longer contain any hazardous material after you do that!

sukij said...

There is no Georgia state law requiring stores to take back CFL's (unfortunately). Other states and/or provinces have done this and I hope Georgia will follow in the future. However, Home Depot does have a CFL recycling program. Additionally, the Athens-Clarke County Recycling program accepts residential quantities of CFL's from ACC residents for recycling. Currently, there is no charge for this program. Contact the ACC Recycling Division with additional questions at 706-613-3512.

Tim said...

Sukij -- Many thanks for that information. I'll stop by Home Depot.

robin said...

unfortunately, CFL's make my migraines worse (and they do for many of us who suffer from migraines). So, although I like the *idea* of CFLs, I surely hope that the whole world doesn't switch to them.

Hopefully, something better will come along....

--- okay, I know that was irrelevant, but for those of you who have switched to CFLs, if you have a migraine sufferer in your house, you might want to be aware of the potential connection. ;-)

Avid Bookshop said...

Robin, I'm another migraineur whose attacks can be triggered by fluorescents (CFLs or the long tubes). I've been really active on this front, trying to make sure the USA doesn't go the way of Australia, a country that is in the process of phasing out all incandescent bulbs.

I'm happy that many folks can and do use CFLs in their homes, but the bulbs must be used in a very precise way in order to be as long-lasting as their manufacturers claim they are. (If you have a CFL bulb in a reading lamp that is flipped on and off a few times a day, the bulb won't last nearly as long as it would have if it were installed in an always-on porch light, for example.)